Drone wars to start: Pakistan builds its own fleet/IRAQ christians facing extinction/Strippers for Jesus: Former Dancer Tries to Save Others/U.S. B-52s flew over China’s newly declared air zone violating China’s Restrictions and more signs of JESUS’ soon return

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China Is On A Debt Binge And A Buying Spree Unlike Anything The World Has Ever Seen Before

When it comes to reckless money creation, it turns out that China is the king. Over the past five years, Chinese bank assets have grown from about 9 trillion dollars to more than 24 trillion dollars. This has been fueled by the greatest private debt binge that the world has ever seen. According to a recent World Bank report, the level of private domestic debt in China has grown from about 9 trillion dollars in 2008 to more than 23 trillion dollars today. In other words, in just five years the amount of money that has been loaned out by banks in China is roughly equivalent to the amount of debt that the U.S. government has accumulated since the end of the Reagan administration. And Chinese bank assets now absolutely dwarf the assets of the U.S. Federal Reserve, the European Central Bank, the Bank of Japan and the Bank of England combined. You can see an amazing chart which shows this right here. A lot of this “hot money” has been flowing out of China and into U.S. companies, U.S. stocks and U.S. real estate. Unfortunately for China (and for the rest of us), there are lots of signs that the gigantic debt bubble in China is about to burst, and when that does happen the entire world is going to feel the pain. It was Zero Hedge that initially broke this story. Over the past several years, most of the focus has been on the reckless money printing that the Federal Reserve has been doing, but the truth is that China has been far more reckless… More

CASH IS DEAD. ARE CREDIT CARDS NEXT?

The future of money has arrived, and it’s called Coin. It looks like a credit card. It’s the size of a credit card. It swipes in credit card machines. But it holds the information of up to eight of your debit, credit, rewards, or gift cards. And you can switch between cards by simply pressing a button. The new product, launched recently, promises to change the way consumers spend money in a secure and efficient way. The key technology is a Bluetooth signal. To load information from your different cards, just swipe them on a card reader into your Apple or Android phone and take a picture of the card. If you’re too far from your card—like, say, you leave it at the restaurant—your phone gets a notification. And the Coin’s battery lasts up to two years. So, what does it cost someone to fundamentally change the way they pay for dinner? $100.Pre-ordering has already started (at the reduced price of $50), and Coin will ship out next summer.
But this San Francisco company is just one of many start-ups across the country that are finding new ways of developing the future of retail. Cash is dead, haven’t you heard? In recent years, Americans have used less and less physical money when purchasing items. Several don’t use it in stores, and many more don’t keep bills and coins in their pockets. The “cling” of stray pennies hitting the counter at your local coffee shop may soon become a distant memory. According to a survey by Walker Sands, a Chicago-based public relations firm, nearly 1-in-5 consumers do not carry any cash on them. In total, more than 60 percent of consumers carry $20 or less in cash. Surprisingly, about 1-in-20 people say they don’t use cash and refuse to go to places that accept only physical currency. (The survey was conducted over the last year among 1,046 consumers across the United States.) And other surveys show a similar trend: According to a 2012 study by Javelin Strategy and Research, 27 percent of purchases in 2011 were made with cash. By 2017, the group expects that number to drop to 23 percent.
So, yes, we’re headed toward a cashless society. But what about plastic credit cards, as well? The end of the George Costanza wallet is near. People use cash less. Receipts are redundant with online banking. And products like Coin allow people to pay digitally, instead of with a physical credit card. Could the George Costanza wallet be a thing of the past? Christine Pietryla, the senior vice president of public relations for Walker Sands, said she was immediately drawn to Coin. It’s a product that fits into her firm’s research: People want their consumer experience to be simpler, easier, and more efficient. ”It’s definitely a challenge to find an application or a solution that puts everything all in one place,” she said. “This is unique in that it does do that.” Consumers are starting to prefer digital options in payments: According to the same research from Walker Sands, 28 percent of consumers are more likely to use a digital gift card, rather than a plastic gift card. It only makes sense that services like PayPal, a business that allows people to make payments and money transfers through the Internet, have taken off.
Similarly, Google Wallet, launched in 2011, allows users to store information for their debit cards, credit cards, reward cards, or gift cards on their mobile phone. For participating stores, someone can just tap their phone to a PayPass terminal to pay for a product. Google Wallet users can all send money through Gmail attachments. Additionally, Google announced last week that it was introducing prepaid debt cards that can be used in ATMs. And in the same survey, 95 percent of people say they’ve purchased something from Amazon in the last year. PayPal, in fact, last week just made a deal with another digital start-up, Uber—a car service company that uses a mobile application to hail rides. Other start-ups, like Isis (which allows consumers to pay for items in person through their smartphones) or Dynamics (which created a similar multi-account card like Coin), also have products that offer a different way of paying for goods. It’s not just how you pay, but how businesses get paid. The future of retail goes well beyond Coin or PayPal. It’s also about how stores are processing your payments.
Any person who works in Washington, New York, or Los Angeles can attest to the growing number of gourmet food trucks that have popped up on street corners around lunchtime. It’s noon, so why not go to Farragut Square and eat at Far East Taco? And for payment, many of these food trucks use the Square Reader—an easy attachment that allows anyone with an iPhone or iPad to process a credit card payment. Even some big-box stores have checkouts with iPads. And it’s not just the Square. What about paying for items without actually going to a checkout line? According to the same Walker Sands study, 59 percent of consumers said they would be more likely to shop at stores that offer self-checkout on mobile devices. Store owners are also turning to digital companies to get around traditional credit card companies that charge too much to process payments. Des Moines, Iowa-based Dwolla is a payment network that allows people to transfer money—either to friends or businesses—more efficiently through a mobile application and its website. And it saves merchants money by charging only 25 cents for transactions over $10—and charging nothing if it’s less. Thousands of companies and consumers have already signed up for the service, which started in 2009. Dwolla has even launched a credit feature, which could compete with credit cards. This is all well and good, but…
Many of these start-ups are just that: start-ups—small outfits of techies who had a vision of a product that challenges the industry to think differently and move in radical directions. For one, it costs a lot of money to change the game. That’s why companies like these rely on crowd-funding. Coin is looking to raise $50,000 beyond what some of its investors have put in. It can also cost a lot of money to buy these new products. Coin is $100—not steep, but not cheap. Other modern payment services, like PayPal or Google Wallet, are free. Additionally, with any new product, there are risks for security breaches. Coin notifies consumers when they might have left it at a restaurant, but their information is still just as much at risk as with a plastic credit card. And no product is guaranteed to catch on. Most consumers are looking for three major qualities in any product: increased security, a tremendous amount of customer service, and a consistent visual experience. In other words, consumers want to know that when they walk into a store or log in to the product’s website or mobile application, it’s all going to look the same, be easy to use, and be visually appealing. If these start-ups lack these qualities, consumers won’t buy into the idea. With Coin, consumers will have to replace their card every two years—shorter than with a normal credit card. And lest we forget a simple truth: Credit cards are already easy to use. Coin is new. It’s unfamiliar. It’s dangerous, to some. But every idea from a start-up company is at least a little risky. ”Start-ups are there to disrupt and be innovative,” Pietryla said. “It’s either going to take off or it’s not.” Two years ago, people might have thought paying with an iPad was crazy. As the technology catches up, consumers get more confident in it. Coin might be just that.Nextgov
A pro-life student group at Central Michigan University (CMU) had their pro-life display torn down and stolen last Wednesday, Campus Reform has learned. The CMU Students for Life (SFL) chapter, arranged a display which featured infant clothing hanging on a clothesline. One out of every four pieces of clothing featuring a red X to symbolize that a quarter of pregnancies end in abortion. The group discovered that the display was missing on Wednesday, and filed a report with campus police. Lt. Larry Klaus of the CMU police department confirmed to Campus Reform earlier today that they have launched an investigation into the incident. Klaus said they are combing through surveillance footage and encouraged anyone with information regarding the stolen display to contact the CMU police. Sarah Donetti, a member of SFL, told Campus Reform in an email last week she is disappointed that someone would attempt to censor their display. ”It is definitely disappointing because our group has been planning this event since last spring and members of our e-board have put a lot of effort into the event,” said Donetti. “I can’t say that I am surprised given the culture of the campus and I think that it’s sad that people can’t just disagree and the only way they can express themselves is by silencing our message,” Donetti added. Camus Reform

Embracing big brother: How facial recognition could help fight crime

From fighting terrorism to processing payments in the blink of an eye, facial recognition is set to change our ideas on privacy. A number of exciting developments in the field could even push its toughest critics to reconsider. ”The more people get out of it, the more they’ll surrender to it,”says Manolo Almagro, senior vice president of digital for TPN Inc.Almagro believes that people will only embrace a technology if the benefits outweigh privacy concerns. Facial recognition is a computer-based system that automatically identifies a person based on a digital image or video source — which is then matched to information stored in a database. Often used in fictional TV-series such as CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, it is soon set to become a real-life tool for fighting crime. In 2014, the FBI will roll the technology out across the U.S. after pilot testing is completed in some states.  Facial recognition is a key part of the agency’s ambitious $1 billion Next Generation Identification System (NGI) — a state-of-the-art biometric identification system that also includes iris scans, DNA analysis and voice identification. The mission is to reduce terrorist and criminal activity by improving and expanding biometric identification as well as criminal history information services.
UK-based Dr. Chris Solomon is an advocate for the technology too. A professor at the University of Kent, Solomon has created an “electronic sketch artist” system that has changed how UK police identify criminals. His method is currently used by 90% of British police and in more than 30 countries. He explains: “The key advantage here is that it allows people to respond to faces they see rather than having to break it down into component parts.” Credited with helping to solve hundreds of crimes, his facial composite software identifies suspected criminals in a new way. The system,  EFIT-V, allows victims and witnesses to select the best and worst matches from a group of computer-generated faces. Based on their responses, the computer eventually “learns” what type of face they are after and displays options accordingly.  Credited with helping to solve hundreds of crimes, his facial composite software identifies suspected criminals in a new way. The system, EFIT-V, allows victims and witnesses to select the best and worst matches from a group of computer-generated faces. Based on their responses, the computer eventually “learns” what type of face they are after and displays options accordingly. More

GMO linked to gluten disorders plaguing 18 million Americans

Genetically modified foods such as soy and corn may be responsible for a number of gluten-related maladies including intestinal disorders now plaguing 18 million Americans, according to a new report released on Tuesday. The report was released by the Institute for Responsible Technology (IRT), and cites authoritative data from the US Department of Agriculture, US Environmental Protection Agency records, medical journal reviews as well as  international research. “Gluten sensitivity can range in severity from mild discomfort, such as gas and bloating, to celiac disease, a serious autoimmune condition that can, if undiagnosed, result in a 4-fold increase in death,” said  Jeffrey M. Smith, executive director of IRT in a statement released on their website.  Smith cited how a “possible environmental trigger may be the introduction of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) to the American food supply, which occurred in the mid-1990s,” describing the nine GM crops currently on the market.  In soy, corn, cotton (oil), canola (oil), sugar from sugar beets, zucchini, yellow squash, Hawaiian papaya, and alfalfa,  “Bt-toxin, glyphosate, and other components of GMOs, are linked to five conditions that may either initiate or exacerbate gluten-related disorders,” according to Smith.  It’s the BT-toxin in genetically modified foods which kills insects by “puncturing holes in their cells.”
The toxin is present in ‘every kernel’ of Bt-corn and survives human digestion, with a 2012 study confirming that it punctures holes in human cells as well.  The GMO-related damage was linked to five different areas: Intestinal permeability, imbalanced gut bacteria, immune activation and allergic response, impaired digestion, and damage to the intestinal wall.  The IRT release also indicated that glyphosate, a weed killer sold under the brand name ‘Roundup’ was also found to have a negative effect on intestinal bacteria. GMO crops contain high levels of the toxin at harvest.  “Even with minimal exposure, glyphosate can significantly reduce the population of beneficial gut bacteria and promote the overgrowth of harmful strains,” the report found.  Dr. Tom O’Bryan, internationally recognized expert on gluten sensitivity and Celiac Disease, says that “the introduction of GMOs is highly suspect as a candidate to explain the rapid rise in gluten-related disorders over the last 17 years.”  Internist, Emily Linder, offered some backup for the report’s findings. She removed GMO from her patients’ diets, finding that recovery from intestinal diseases was faster and more complete.  “I believe that GMOs in our diet contribute to the rise in gluten-sensitivity in the US population,” Linder said in the release. RT

Deal opens Iran economy to untold billions

ObamaIranUnder the interim deal between Iran and Western powers, Tehran’s economy could be flooded with untold billions in sanctions relief and other gains, far more than the widely reported amount of $6 to $7 billion. In fact, the final text of the deal does not specify any dollar amount for sanctions relief. It leaves the U.S. and Europe open to unfreezing more funds and facilitating an unspecified amount in other transactions and sales.  A White House press release states the deal will result in “approximately $7 billion in relief,” calling that amount “a fraction of the costs that Iran will continue to incur during this first phase under the sanctions that will remain in place.” “The vast majority of Iran’s approximately $100 billion in foreign exchange holdings are inaccessible or restricted by sanctions,” states the release.
However, a careful reading of the agreement, posted on the EU’s website, finds numerous open-ended statements about sanctions relief. If Iran keeps its side of the bargain, the deal allows an increase in European Union “authorisation thresholds for transactions for non-sanctioned trade to an agreed amount.” No amount for the thresholds are provided in the text of the deal. The agreement states the U.S. and EU will “enable the repatriation of an agreed amount of revenue held abroad.” No specific amount is delineated in the deal.  The agreement states the U.S. and EU will “enable the repatriation of an agreed amount of revenue held abroad.” No specific amount is delineated in the deal.

In one clause that could potentially free untold billions, the deal establishes a “financial channel to facilitate humanitarian trade for Iran’s domestic needs using Iranian oil revenues held abroad.” No cap is provided for the amount of revenue that could be made available. An open-ended footnote states the “humanitarian” trade financial channel “would involve specified foreign banks and non-designated Iranian banks to be defined when establishing the channel.” More sanctions relief spelled out in the text of the deal includes a Western agreement to:
  • Pause efforts to further reduce Iran’s crude oil sales, enabling Iran’s current customers to purchase their current average amounts of crude oil. For such oil sales, it suspends the EU and U.S. sanctions on associated insurance and transportation services.
  • Suspend U.S. and EU sanctions on Iran’s petrochemical exports, as well as sanctions on associated services, gold and precious metals.
  • Suspend U.S. sanctions on Iran’s auto industry, as well as sanctions on associated services.
  • License the supply and installation in Iran of spare parts for safety of flight for Iranian civil aviation and associated services.
  • License safety related inspections and repairs in Iran as well as associated services.
  • Not impose new nuclear-related U.N. Security Council sanctions.
  • Not impose new EU nuclear-related sanctions.
  • In the case of the U.S. administration, acting consistently with the respective roles of the president and the Congress, refrain from imposing new nuclear-related sanctions. WND

 ’2016′: Obama plans to ‘take America down’

In the 2012 highest-grossing documentary, “2016: Obama’s America,” political commentator Dinesh D’Souza made some startling predictions about the second term of Barack Obama – and now he has released a fresh, eight-minute addition to the film revealing how the president plans to “take America down a notch.” D’Souza explains, “One of the predictions is that Obama would spend money promiscuously to raise the debt in virtual indifference to the impact of the debt on American citizens. In fact, Obama has been racking up the debt at the rate of $1 trillion a year. The debt has doubled in Obama’s term in office.” Obama’s plot to “drag the economy down” and redistribute American wealth to the rest of the world – and financially cripple the nation – he explains, “is a transfer of hundreds of billions, in fact trillions of dollars, out of the United States and into other countries.” Watch the new addition to the film:  In his addition to the film, D’Souza also explains exactly why and how “Obama wants to shrink the influence of American foreign policy” by “undermining our allies and … allowing our adversaries to remain in power.” In an email announcing the film update, D’Souza wrote, “[T]here are those within our country that seek to undermine [America’s] exceptionalism and ‘take us down a notch.’ What’s worse is that one of those people happens to be the president of the United States. “When I directed ’2016: Obama’s America’ over a year ago, I prayed that I would be wrong. The damage that I predicted Obama would do to our country could never be worth an ‘I told you so.’ “Unfortunately, I wasn’t wrong. Wielding a weaponized national debt and a disdain for our standing in the world, President Obama draws us nearer and nearer to the dystopia that I warned against in 2016.” WND

Chinese buying up California housing

At a brand new housing development in Irvine, Calif., some of America’s largest home builders are back at work after a crippling housing crash. Lennar, Pulte, K Hovnanian, Ryland to name a few. It’s a rebirth for U.S. construction, but the customers are largely Chinese. ”They see the market here still has room for appreciation,” said Irvine-area real estate agent Kinney Yong, of RE/MAX Premier Realty. “What’s driving them over here is that they have this cash, and they want to park it somewhere or invest somewhere.” Yong’s phone has been ringing off the hook, with more than 5,000 new homes slated for the nearby Great Park Neighborhood. Most of the calls are from overseas, but prospective buyers are not looking solely for financial returns on the real estate.  ”We are seeing a lot of Asians who are buying as an investment, but their kids are going to school here, so kids live in the home. They are looking at it more as an investment in education,” said Emile Haddad, CEO of Fivepoint Communities, developer of the Great Park Neighborhood.
That is Brian Yang’s plan. Speaking from his home in China, Yang said he purchased a home in Irvine this year, but he will wait five years, until his daughter turns 10, before moving his family to the U.S. He has several reasons for taking the leap. ”Education in America is very good and world class, so the first one is for education, and I think the second one is for the property appreciation,” explained Yang.   While American secondary schools and universities are a big draw for the majority of Chinese buyers in California, Yang, and many of his colleagues, are also concerned about China’s political instability, inflation, even pollution. They are paying all-cash for real estate in California, using it as a safe-haven for their wealth. Yang was reluctant to talk about the money, but he admitted, “I feel the same way to some extent.” For now, Yang is renting out the four-bedroom home, and, he said, getting a 5 percent return on the investment.

While Yang purchased an older home, the new model homes at Great Park are drawing thousands of potential buyers. In fact, more than 20,000 attended the opening weekend, according to developers. The vast majority of lookers were Asian, and that fact is not lost on the builders. Hoping to cash in on this new wave of investors, they are tailoring the homes to the demand. Some are incorporating multigenerational floor plans and even Feng Shui designs. ”The imbalance of supply and demand here is really driving a lot of competition for these homes,” said Haddad. The homes range from the mid-$700,000s to well over $1 million. Cash is king, and there is a seemingly limitless amount. ”The price doesn’t matter, 800,000, 1 million, 1.5. If they like it they will purchase it,” said Helen Zhang of Tarbell Realtors. Zhang was coming out of one of the models with a Chinese couple pushing a toddler in a stroller and carrying an infant. As our CNBC camera crew interviewed Zhang, another group of potential buyers roaming the neighborhood models raised their brochures to hide their faces when they saw the camera. While no one would say specifically why certain families were shying away from the media, some alluded to the fact that many of the buyers don’t want any questions about where the cash is coming from. Some are buying multiple homes as investments, while others are moving their families to the U.S., intending to stay at least until their children graduate from college. CNBC
F16A Pentagon spokesman says the United States will not comply with China’s new air defense zone in the East China Sea and is prepared to defend its aircraft that enter the region. Shortly after China declared it was establishing an Air Defense Identification Zone in the East China Sea, U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel issued a statement condemning the move and saying the new Chinese policy would not in any way change how the United States conducts military operations in the region. On Monday, Pentagon spokesman U.S. Army Colonel Steve Warren made the U.S. position even clearer. “When we fly into this aerial zone we will not register a flight plan. We will not identify our transponder, our radio frequency, and our logo,” he said.

Those were the four things that Warren said China was now requiring of all aircraft entering the zone, which includes the Senkaku islands over which Beijing has a dispute with Japan. “That was not a requirement last week. American forces could just fly through there without having to do any of those things. We will continue not doing those things,” said the spokesman. The United States said the area was international air space and was prepared to defend its aircraft against a Chinese attack on American military aircraft. U.S. military aircraft that fly in the region are usually part of training exercises and are usually unarmed. Pentagon officials said U.S. forces always maintained an ability to defend themselves, but did not specify what assets the United States was ready to use in the event of any Chinese aggression. Voice of America

Rouhani says Geneva nuclear deal increased Israel’s isolation

The first-stage deal signed between Iran and world powers in Geneva has caused the isolation of the Islamic Republic’s enemies, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani said on Tuesday in a TV question-and-answer session marking the first 100 days of his presidency. “Many were trying to isolate Iran, but who is isolated today? Our enemies are in fact isolated,” the Iranian president said, according to Iran’s PressTV.   While he did not mention Israel specifically, he used a language commonly used by Arab nations to describe it, speaking of “an illegitimate, occupier regime.” Following the signing two days prior of the deal with the P5+1 group to halt nuclear enrichment for six months as talks continue in an effort to reach a more permanent accord, Rouhani vowed to the Iranian people that Tehran will never stop uranium enrichment.
“Enrichment, which is one part of our nuclear right, will continue, it is continuing today and it will continue tomorrow and our enrichment will never stop and this is our red line,” he said. He boasted that his administration was able to neutralize a rift of unilateral and multilateral sanctions against Iran and that the deal created cracks in the sanctions regime. As a part of the deal signed on Sunday, Iran has agreed to take measures to curb some of its nuclear activity in return for some sanctions relief and the promise no new sanctions will be imposed on Tehran in the next six months. Jerusalem Post

Iran accuses White House of Lying About Details of Nuke Deal

Iranian officials say that the White House is misleading the public about the details of an interim nuclear agreement reached over the weekend in Geneva. Iran and Western nations including the United States came to an agreement on the framework for an interim deal late Saturday night in Geneva. The deal has yet to be implemented The White House released a multi-page fact sheet containing details of the draft agreement shortly after the deal was announced. However, Iranian foreign ministry official on Tuesday rejected the White House’s version of the deal as “invalid” and accused Washington of releasing a factually inaccurate primer that misleads the American public. “What has been released by the website of the White House as a fact sheet is a one-sided interpretation of the agreed text in Geneva and some of the explanations and words in the sheet contradict the text of the Joint Plan of Action, and this fact sheet has unfortunately been translated and released in the name of the Geneva agreement by certain media, which is not true,” Foreign Ministry Spokeswoman Marziyeh Afkham told the Iranian press on Tuesday.
Afkham and officials said that the White House has “modified” key details of the deal and released their own version of the agreement. Iran’s right to enrich uranium, the key component in a nuclear weapon, is fully recognized under the draft released by Tehran. “This comprehensive solution would enable Iran to fully enjoy its right to nuclear energy for peaceful purposes under the relevant articles of the NPT in conformity with its obligations therein,” the agreement reads, according to a copy released to Iranian state-run media. “This comprehensive solution would involve a mutually defined enrichment programme with practical limits and transparency measures to ensure the peaceful nature of the programme,” the Iranian draft reads. “This comprehensive solution would constitute an integrated whole where nothing is agreed until everything is agreed.” Iran’s objection to the deal raises new concerns about final stage talks meant to ensure that the deal is implemented in the next few weeks.
The White House confirmed to the Washington Free Beacon on Monday that the final details of the plan have yet to be worked out, meaning that Iran is not yet beholden to a six month freeze its nuclear activities. “Technical details to implement the Joint Plan of Action must be finalized before the terms of the Plan begin,” a senior administration official told the Free Beacon. “The P5+1 and Iran are working on what the timeframe is.” The White House could not provide additional details on the timeframe when approached by the Free Beacon on Tuesday. As the details are finalized, Iran will have the ability to continue its most controversial enrichment program. This drew criticism from proponents of tough nuclear restrictions. “The six month clock should have started early Sunday morning,” said former Ambassador Mark Wallace, the CEO of United Against a Nuclear Iran (UANI). “If this is a serious agreement, the P5+1 must ensure that these negotiations do not become a tool for Iran to further increase its enrichment abilities.” Christians United for Israel (CUFI) Executive Director David Brog said he fears that the White House may have been “played by the Iranians.”
“This may prove to be yet another worrisome sign that the Obama Administration was played by the Iranians,” Brog told the Free Beacon in a statement. “Their concessions were either illusory or meaningless, while ours will resuscitate the Iranian economy.” The White House said in its fact sheet on the deal that it could release up to $7 billion dollars to Iran during the first phase of the agreement. The United States additionally agreed to suspend “certain sanctions on gold and precious metals, Iran’s auto sector, and Iran’s petrochemical exports, potentially providing Iran approximately $1.5 billion in revenue,” according to the now disputed fact sheet. Iran could earn another $4.2 billion in oil revenue under the deal. Another “$400 million in governmental tuition assistance” could also be “transferred from restricted Iranian funds directly to recognized educational institutions in third countries to defray the tuition costs of Iranian students,” according to the White House. While Iranian foreign ministry officials did not specify their precise disagreements with the White House, they insisted that “the Iranian delegation was much rigid and laid much emphasis on the need for this accuracy.” The Washington Free Beacon

Why the post-antibiotic world is the real-life version of the zombie apocalypse

Right now, humanity is engaged in an epic battle against fast-adapting and merciless predators. No, zombies are not beating down doors to tear chunks of flesh out of the living. Rather, humanity is being hunted by deadly pathogenic bacteria that have gained resistance to antibiotics. And thanks to the peculiar incentives that drive the pharmaceutical industry, it looks like the cavalry may be a long time in coming. To understand the current state of the antibiotics market, we have to go back millennia. Humans have co-existed with bacteria throughout our history. They live in our bodies from birth to death. It’s estimated that up to three percent of a typical human’s body mass is made up of symbiotic bacteria, which assist us with bodily functions like digesting food. Most bacteria in the human body are kept in check by the body’s immune system. But bacteria are constantly evolving to survive and reproduce. Either the immune system successfully adapts to new threats, or the body risks being overrun. Sometimes the immune system will fail to respond to a novel bacterial threat, allowing the bacteria to kill the host.
Before antibiotics were widely available, any accident, injury, or medical procedure that allowed pathogenic bacteria into the body was potentially deadly. One in nine skin infections was fatal. One in three cases of pneumonia led to death. Invasive surgeries including caesarean sections left the patient open to killer infections. Insect bites, burns, and blood transfusions frequently became a source of infection. So the discovery of the first antibiotic, penicillin, by Alexander Fleming in 1928 remains one of the high points in medical history. Antibiotics kill bacteria, which meant wounds were no longer death sentences. Yet when Fleming won the Nobel Prize for medicine in 1945, he warned of the dangers of antibiotic resistance: It is not difficult to make microbes resistant to penicillin in the laboratory by exposing them to concentrations not sufficient to kill them… There is the danger that the ignorant man may easily underdose himself and by exposing his microbes to non-lethal quantities of the drug make them resistant. [NobelPrize.org]
Fleming’s prediction was right. Penicillin-resistant bacteria arrived while the drug was still being given to only a few patients. Each new class of antibiotics since then has soon been greeted by resistant bacteria. One breeding ground for antibiotic-resistant bacteria is in farm animals. Low doses of antibiotics have been used since the 1950s to enhance growth. In the U.S., over 80 percent of all antibiotics are now used on farm animals. But low doses encourage resistance, just as Fleming warned. Recent studies show that antibiotic-resistant bacteria have been found widely in farm animals raised for meat, as well as wild animals, including crows, foxes, and sharks. Scientists are fighting a running evolutionary battle with the bugs. A patient in New Zealand died this year after contracting an infection resistant to all known antibiotics. Doctors declared him the first patient of the “post-antibiotic era.” The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently warned that drug-resistant bacteria kill at least 23,000 people annually in the U.S, and cost the health care system $20 billion per year.
Unfortunately for the human race, research into antibiotics remains costly. One estimate suggests that the cost of bringing a new antibiotic to market is over $1 billion, and that new antibiotics lose $50 million on average. There are far more profitable drugs for pharmaceutical companies to throw money at, since antibiotics are usually single-serve drugs for humans, not long-term treatments. Drugs for chronic conditions tend to be more profitable. And with drug resistance quickly evolving, rendering older antibiotics ineffective, pharmaceutical companies have even less incentive to invest in the drugs. The economics are perverse. Taking preventative action today would not be very profitable because there are fewer potential customers. The incentives to produce more and better antibiotics only kick in under the worst circumstances, when millions of people are dying from antibiotic-resistant infections. With investment, there would be plenty of reasons to be optimistic about the future. New antibiotics today are typically discovered by culturing bacteria in a laboratory, and scientists so far have cultured less than one percent of the bacterial species on the planet, meaning there is still a huge pool of possibilities out there that remains untested.
There are also a large variety of organic compounds — for example, from insects — that may hold promise as antibacterials. Some scientists are even looking into the possibility of using nanotechnology to fight bacteria — tiny machines that can hunt down pathogenic bacteria and destroy them. Sooner or later, one of these approaches may yield an innovation that pathogenic bacteria cannot develop resistance to. In July 2012, President Obama signed the GAIN (Generating Antibiotic Incentives Now) Act, a bipartisan bill to fast-track the creation of new antibiotics. Twelve new antibiotics in development have so far received fast-track status, which should speed up the approval of new drugs for difficult-to-treat conditions. But whether the law will be sufficient to create enough new antibiotics to win the evolutionary arms race remains to be seen. Developing antibiotics is still expensive, and the antibiotics that we do have are still being over-prescribed for humans and doled out in sub-clinical doses to farm animals — both of which gives bacteria opportunities to develop resistance. If the problem continues to grow, the U.S. and other countries will have to invest a whole lot more in antimicrobial technologies, or create incentives for Big Pharma to do so. Like the zombie apocalypse, the post-antibiotic world would not be a pretty place to live in. The Week
Proponents of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) often insist that the new standards are not a federal takeover of education. Actually, Common Core supporters could be right in one sense: Common Core is not so much about a nationalization of education as it is part of a world-wide initiative that may ultimately serve to make American values and practices secondary to global sharing. Writing at Crisis Magazine, journalist Mary Jo Anderson asserts that Common Core is nothing less than the latest attempt by the U.N. to impose on the United States a globalist perspective with the utopian goals of worldwide peace, environmental sustainability, and economic fairness. In that context, Common Core is part of the Obama administration’s “transformational” education plan that places emphasis on global relationships rather than a unique American culture. It is commonly known that Common Core is being financed with more than $150 million from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. In addition, the Gates Foundation has collaborated with the United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). In 2004, Gates’ Microsoft Corporation signed a Cooperation Agreement with UNESCO to develop a “master curriculum” which would include benchmarks and a testing program. According to the agreement, “UNESCO will explore how to facilitate content development.”
In the Agreement, UNESCO maps out its intention to establish “Knowledge Communities,” which it defines as “web-based communities of practice in UNESCO’s fields.” The goal is to create, through Information and Communication Technology (ICT) throughout the globe, communities without borders, in a sense, so that all students around the world are learning similar content and sharing knowledge. As many Americans are aware, Common Core relies heavily upon increased broadband width. In at least some states and local school districts, total reconstruction of Internet capabilities has been necessary. According to Anderson, in this concept of globalism that UNESCO and Microsoft proposed, “a nation is permitted to keep its surface culture, such as language, music, and cuisine. But patriotism, religion, and individualism are anathema, as each competes with the globalist vision of world harmony.” Anderson writes that the most efficient way to urge a nation to abandon its culture and natural resources is to “invest in education to ensure that the coming generation will embrace the principles of globalism as a natural consequence of their formation.”
Despite the continued, overt insistence of the Obama administration–and some prominent Republicans–that Common Core is a state and local endeavor, U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan has actively promoted the standards in the U.S. Recently, however, he may have dealt a serious blow to the endeavor, with a controversial comment made during a meeting of state schools superintendents. Feeling the heat of increased opposition to Common Core, Duncan said that those who oppose the new standards are “white suburban moms who – all of a sudden – their child isn’t as brilliant as they thought.” In 2010, Duncan addressed UNESCO, and in his remarks said that education would be the “beacon” that would light the way to stem a “global economic crisis.” Offering “two overarching messages” about America’s efforts to “transform” education and achievement, Duncan said:

First, the Obama administration has an ambitious and unified theory of action that propels our agenda. The challenge of transforming education in America cannot be met by quick-fix solutions or isolated reforms. It can only be accomplished with a clear, coherent, and coordinated vision of reform. Second, while America must improve its stagnant educational and economic performance, President Obama and I both reject the protectionist Cold War-era assumption that improving economic competitiveness is somehow a zero-sum game, with one nation’s gain being another country’s loss. Duncan cited Obama in the latter’s speech “to the Muslim world in Cairo” in 2009: “Any world order that elevates one nation or group of people over another will inevitably fail.” “In the United States, we feel an economic and moral imperative to challenge the status quo,” Duncan said. “Closing the achievement gap and closing the opportunity gap is the civil rights issue of our generation.”

Lamenting the high number of high school dropouts in the United States, Duncan said that global “partnerships” will inspire students to take responsibility for the betterment of the global community. “A just and socially responsible society must also be anchored in civic engagement for the public good,” he said. “Education, as Nelson Mandela says, ‘is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.’” Ironically, Duncan also touted in his UNESCO address that President Obama “wants to expand school choice to encourage innovation – and spread the effective practices of high-performing schools to all schools.” It is doubtful, however, that school choice is in President Obama’s “transformational” education plan, as most Americans define it. Recently, the Department of Justice challenged the state of Louisiana in court for starting a scholarship program that frees low-income minority children from failing schools. Last Friday, Attorney General Eric Holder decided to drop the initial lawsuit and instead announced he will seek to require Louisiana to submit to a bureaucratic review process that would mandate all voucher application information be sent to the federal government prior to awards being granted to students. Similarly, the Obama administration has had a history of fighting the successful Washington, D.C. Opportunity Scholarship Program (OSP). The message from the Obama administration, then, seems to be that school choice will be tolerated only if it is regulated by the federal government.
Duncan went on to tell UNESCO the Obama administration has set a goal that the United States “will once again have the highest proportion of college graduates in the world,” a goal that “can only be achieved by creating a strong cradle-to-career continuum that starts with early childhood learning and extends all the way to college and careers.” Finally, in his description of the plans to achieve this goal, Duncan went on to tell UNESCO how the Obama administration used its Race to the Top stimulus bill grants to entice states to participate in the Common Core standards. Barack Obama said he would “fundamentally transform” the United States of America. He has failed at transforming America’s economy and America’s health care system. Are American parents willing to trust his plan to transform their children’s education? Breitbart
The World Health Organization said on Tuesday that additional polio cases had been confirmed in two new areas of Syria, including near Damascus and in the northern city of Aleppo near Turkey. ”In addition to 15 polio cases in Deir al-Zor province, Syria, two additional cases have been confirmed, one each in rural Damascus and Aleppo,” the organization said on its Twitter account. The incurable virus was confirmed this month in 13 children who became paralyzed. The WHO says polio is expected to spread after a drop in vaccination rates due to the war. WHO spokeswoman Sona Bari said the virus had reached Aleppo, once Syria’s most populous city where forces loyal to President Bashar al-Assad are fighting rebels trying to end four decades of family rule. Polio is endemic in Pakistan, Afghanistan and Nigeria despite a 25-year-old campaign to eradicate the disease, which can paralyze a child within hours. This is Syria’s first polio outbreak since 1999. More than 20 million children are to be vaccinated in Syria and neighboring countries over the next six months, United Nations agencies say. Syria’s immunization rates have plummeted from more than 90 percent before the conflict to around 68 percent. Yahoo Health
NEW ZEALAND – The Canterbury earthquakes were even more unusual than first thought and unlikely to occur anywhere else in the world, new research reveals. The research, led by seismologist Martin Reyners of GNS Science, showed the unusual rock structure of the region meant the Canterbury earthquakes produced some of the strongest vertical ground accelerations ever seen in an earthquake. The makeup of this unique dense and thick slab of rock could have implications for other regions around the lower South Island. “There will be few other places in the world where a similar earthquake sequence might occur,” Reyners said. The research, published in Nature Geoscienceshowed that the strong quakes in Canterbury also could cause widespread cracking and weakening of the earth’s crust – challenging the common assumption that the strength of the crust was constant. Normally rocks become hot and “plastic” at depths of about 10km. However, the researchers found that strong, brittle rocks continued to a depth of about 30km under Canterbury. “Strong rocks store and release strain differently to weak rocks,” Reyners said. This unusually thick and dense slab of rock helps to explain the long and energetic aftershock sequence in Canterbury, he said. Seismic energy would have dissipated more quickly in softer rock. The researchers were now focused on determining how widespread this strong rock unit is in the lower half of the South Island. “This is important for defining the earthquake hazard for people living between mid-Canterbury and Southland,” Reyners said. The researchers had initially set out to determine the three-dimensional structure of the crust under Canterbury by using a technique called seismic tomography – similar to a medical CAT scan or ultrasound.
This helps to get more accurate aftershock locations and better define the many smaller faults that ruptured in the earthquakes. Instead, researchers found that rock properties had changed significantly over a wide area around the Greendale Fault, which ruptured on 4 September 2010 producing a magnitude 7.1 quake. “This finding was entirely unexpected, but it explains why the main shock released so much energy,” Reyners said. Most of the quakes in the two-year-long Canterbury sequence released abnormally high levels of energy – this was consistent with the ruptures occurring on very strong faults that store energy slowly and gradually and are hard to break.  The Canterbury quakes had their genesis 100 million years ago when very strong rocks became emplaced under Canterbury, he said. Extinction Protocol

Seismic rock ruptures reported in Kuwait- Lima rattled by 5.5 magnitude quake

KUWAIT  – The national seismic network at Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research (KISR) said on Tuesday that it had detected seismic waves in some of the network’s stations, at 10:06 a.m., but no activity that classifies as an earthquake. The network’s press release indicated the investigation into the observation showed that the readings were caused by rock ruptures. It further explained that a seismic wave is a wave of energy that travels through the Earth’s layers, and could be the result of an earthquake, explosion, or a volcano that imparts low-frequency acoustic energy, and also some types of human activity. On October 29, 2013, the region of Kuwait was hit by a 3.7 magnitude tremor.
5.5 mag quake rattles Lima: LIMA, Peru (AP) — A moderately strong earthquake has shaken Lima but no damage or injuries have been reported. The U.S. Geological Survey says the 5.5-magnitude quake was centered about 72 miles southeast of Lima and was 46 miles deep. Peru’s National Geophysics Institute measured the quake at 5.8 magnitude and said it hit at about 3:07 local time (20:07 GMT). The quake struck in two jolts, the first of longer duration, and some office workers in Lima filed out of buildings into the street. Extinction Protocol

Nearly 4 years after quake, Haitians still in tents

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti – Eight-year-old Widlene Gabriel has lived nearly half her life in a camp for the hundreds of thousands of people displaced by the devastating January 2010 earthquake in desperately poor Haiti. As the fourth anniversary of the disaster approaches, more than 170,000 Haitians are still living in makeshift housing, in extremely precarious conditions and sometimes facing eviction. Widlene and her family live in a tent on a private lot along a main road linking the capital Port-au-Prince to the eastern suburb of Petionville. The girl has never been to school and spends her days staring blankly at cars and trucks speeding along the road nearby. “On January 12, 2010, the roof of our house fell on top of our heads. I wasn’t hurt but our house fell apart and so we came here,” Widlene recalls, her bare feet covered in dust. Manette Nazius, a mother of six, says Widlene is hardly the only child seemingly left behind. “All the kids here are in the same boat. All days are the same. They drag around all day. In fact, we are living without hope and we all feel abandoned,” she says. An estimated 250,000 people were killed in the quake, and the rebuilding process has been slow in Haiti, which was already one of the world’s poorest countries when disaster struck.
In the immediate aftermath, more than 1.5 million people were homeless. Huddled under Tent 15, which doubles as a church at the entrance of the camp, a small group of women chanted “Blessed be the lord. Blessed be the lord.” The pastor, in his 60s, stood at the entrance, but the faithful were few. “We still support them in prayer,” said the 60-something pastor, who gave his name as Pierre. “They are people who have been abandoned by the authorities. They have nothing. But God does not punish twice.” Nevertheless, the young and homeless say they are without hope and feel they have been forgotten. Since 2011, the government has been able to relocate more than 60,000 families and take back some of the public spaces occupied by the unsanitary camps. But about 172,000 people still live sprawled across 300 camps, according to the International Organization for Migration. Residents of the camp where Widlene lives say they have no alternatives, surviving thanks to odd jobs and whatever food scraps they can gather.
“We live like brothers and sisters. We help each other out but we don’t expect anything from the government,” said Bladimir Eliancy, a 30-something resident who was trained as a mechanic. At another camp – a group of tents were set up on a property once owned by the Italian mission – the feeling of despair is the same. “We have been forgotten by the authorities and international organizations no longer visit us,” said a dejected Donald Duvert. “Sometimes, we get angry. But we are good citizens. We don’t go out into the streets to attack the rich. But just take a look at how we live,” he added, pointing to the dilapidated tents that house 150 families. Joseph Gino, seeking a bit of shade under a mango tree, echoed Duvert’s hopelessness. “Before, life was very difficult for us. Today, there is no life. Only God knows when we’ll get out of here – or maybe the decision-makers do,” he said. More
Two U.S. Air Force B-52 aircraft on Monday flew into China’s newly claimed air defense zone over the East China Sea without identifying themselves as China would have wanted, a U.S. official confirmed Tuesday. This follows China’s move last week to announce a new air zone over islands that both China and Japan claim. The flights of the B-52s would not be a departure from the United States’ previously stated intentions. Since China declared the new air zone last week, the United States said it would continue with its own air operations in the region and not recognize China’s new restrictions, which require aircraft entering the zone to identify themselves and file flight plans. The B-52s, which flew from Guam and returned there without incident, were not armed because it was a training mission. The mission lasted for several hours, but the aircraft were in the newly declared Chinese air zone for about an hour, according to the U.S. official. The official declined to be named because of the sensitivity of the situation. CNN

Is Bitcoin About To Change The World?

The past weeks have seen a surprising meeting of minds between chairman of the US Federal Reserve Ben Bernanke, the Bank of England, the Olympic-rowing and Zuckerberg-bothering Winklevoss twins, and the US Department of Homeland Security. The connection? All have decided it’s time to take Bitcoin seriously. Until now, what pundits called in a rolling-eye fashion “the new peer-to-peer cryptocurrency” had been seen just as a digital form of gold, with all the associated speculation, stake-claiming and even “mining”; perfect for the digital wild west of the internet, but no use for real transactions. Bitcoins are mined by computers solving fiendishly hard mathematical problems. The “coin” doesn’t exist physically: it is a virtual currency that exists only as a computer file. No one computer controls the currency. A network keeps track of all transactions made using Bitcoins but it doesn’t know what they were used for – just the ID of the computer “wallet” they move from and to. Right now the currency is tricky to use, both in terms of the technological nous required to actually acquire Bitcoins, and finding somewhere to spend them. To get them, you have to first set up a wallet, probably online at a site such as Blockchain.info, and then pay someone hard currency to get them to transfer the coins into that wallet. A Bitcoin payment address is a short string of random characters, and if used carefully, it’s possible to make transactions anonymously. That’s what made it the currency of choice for sites such as the Silk Road and Black Market Reloaded, which let users buy drugs anonymously over the internet. It also makes it very hard to tax transactions, despite the best efforts of countries such as Germany, which in August declared that Bitcoin was “private money” in which transactions should be taxed as normal.
It doesn’t have all the advantages of cash, though the fact you can’t forge it is a definite plus: Bitcoin is “peer-to-peer” and every coin “spent” is authenticated with the network. Thus you can’t spend the same coin in two different places. (But nor can you spend it without an internet connection.) You don’t have to spend whole Bitcoins: each one can be split into 100m pieces (each known as a satoshi), and spent separately. Although most people have now vaguely heard of Bitcoin, you’re unlikely to find someone outside the tech community who really understands it in detail, let alone accepts it as payment. Nobody knows who invented it; its pseudonymous creator, Satoshi Nakamoto, hasn’t come forward. He or she may not even be Japanese but certainly knows a lot about cryptography, economics and computing. It was first presented in November 2008 in an academic paper shared with a cryptography mailing list. It caught the attention of that community but took years to take off as a niche transaction tool. The first Bitcoin boom and bust came in 2011, and signalled that it had caught the attention of enough people for real money to get involved – but also posed the question of whether it could ever be more than a novelty. The algorithm for mining Bitcoins means the number in circulation will never exceed 21m and this limit will be reached in around 2140. Already 57% of all Bitcoins have been created; by 2017, 75% will have been. If you tried to create a Bitcoin in 2141, every other computer on the network would reject it as fake because it would not have been made according to the rules of currency.

Britain will “discourage” Israel from trying to undermine the nuclear deal with Iran, UK Foreign Secretary William Hague says. Israeli media criticizes PM Benjamin Netanyahu for reacting over “personal failure” as he refuses to be “bound” by the deal. “We would discourage anybody in the world, including Israel, from taking any steps that would undermine this agreement and we will make that very clear to all concerned,” Hague told the UK parliament on Monday. He said that there was no apparent sign that any country opposed to the agreement would try to disrupt it “in any practical way,” adding that the UK would still be “on its guard.”  Hague’s words came after Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu proclaimed that “Israel is not bound by this agreement” and his government “will not allow Iran to obtain military nuclear capability,” calling Sunday’s deal of the six world powers with Iran a “historic mistake.”
But Netanyahu’s statement of Israel being “by itself” and ready to act at any moment in defiance of the peaceful international agreement has prompted media criticism at home. The Telegraph quoted the mass circulation Yedioth Ahronoth newspaper as saying that the Israeli Prime minister’s words were prompted by a “sense of personal failure.”  “This happened on his watch, and it happened despite the fact that he turned this fight into the battle slogan of his term. But in his position, personal disappointments cannot go to a person’s head,” wrote the newspaper’s chief columnist, Nahum Barnea.  Another writer at the same paper, Alon Pinkas, agreed with Netanyahu’s viewpoint on the deal, but accused the prime minister of “behaving oddly in the international arena,” saying such rhetoric “destabilizes” the US-Israeli alliance and thus only weakens Israel.  More

Halperin: Death Panels Built Into Obamacare

Mark Halperin, a senior political analyst for Time magazine, told Newsmax TV that Democrats and the corporate media did not level with the public on death panels built into Obamacare.  Halperin said the death panel concept is a cornerstone of Obamacare. “It’s built into the plan. It’s not like a guess or like a judgment. That’s going to be part of how costs are controlled,” Halperin told Steve Malzberg. Halperin makes his comments eight minutes into the above video. Democrats have used the term “death panel” as a pejorative after the former Republican Governor of Alaska, Sarah Plain, used it in a debate on Obamacare in 2009. Democrats and the corporate media boast they have “debunked” the claim and insist eugenics practices are not part of Obamacare. PolitiFact characterized the term as its “Lie of Year” in 2009 and FactCheck said it represents one of its “whoppers.” Democrats and supporters of the Obamacare fiasco have fought a running battle since the Keynesian economist and New York Times columnist Paul Krugman said in February that in order for the collectivist welfare state to run smoothly higher taxes and death panels will be mandatory. “Eventually we do have a problem. That the population is getting older, health care costs are rising,” Krugman said, admitting that “there is this question of how we’re going to pay for the programs… So the snarky version… which I shouldn’t even say because it will get me in trouble, is death panels and sales taxes is how we do this.” Info Wars

Netanyahu Scolded Obama In Phone Call On Iran Deal according to sources

“The prime minister made it clear to the most powerful man on earth that if he intends to stay the most powerful man on earth, it’s important to make a change in American policy because the practical result of his current policy is liable to lead him to the same failure that the Americans absorbed in North Korea and Pakistan, and Iran could be next in line.” That was the message conveyed by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to President Barack Obama in a private telephone call Sunday to discuss the interim deal on Iran’s nuclear program, according to a senior Israeli lawmaker in Netanyahu’s ruling coalition, as reported by the Jerusalem Post. The White House’s own official statement on the telephone call made no mention of any disagreement being aired, merely referring to “their shared goal of preventing Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon.”Breitbart

Israel Launches Largest Ever Air Force Exercise Day After Iran Deal

In what some would see as no coincidence, Israel launched its largest every international air force exercise just a day after the Iran nuclear “deal” which has left Tel Aviv fuming.  According to the Israeli Defense Forces blog, “On Sunday, November 24, for the first time in Israel’s history, the Israel Air Force launched the “Blue Flag” training exercise – an international air force exercise with participation by the US, Italian and Greek air forces.” The exercise will run until Thursday this week and is designed to “improve Israel’s general air defense capabilities.” However, the drill, which involves “simulated enemy forces,” will almost certainly test Israel’s offensive mettle given that it takes place just a month after an IAF long-range flight exercise during which the IAF’s ability to fly “exceptionally long distances” was put to the test. “We are sure it was all planned a long time ago but the irony is not lost on us,” notes Zero Hedge. Israel responded to Sunday’s “historic” deal by vowing to do “whatever is necessary” to stop Iran from going nuclear. Israeli officials have also visited Saudi Arabia in recent days to inspect bases that could be used to launch an attack on Iran’s nuclear facilities. In a phone call to Barack Obama after the deal was struck, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu told the president, “it’s important to make a change in American policy because the practical result of his current policy is liable to lead him to the same failure that the Americans absorbed in North Korea and Pakistan, and Iran could be next in line,” according to a senior Israeli lawmaker in Netanyahu’s ruling coalition. The deal with Iran halts the enrichment of uranium to below 5%, far below the 90% required to build a nuclear bomb and puts a stop to construction of any more enrichment facilities. Netanyahu insisted that the deal “turns the world into a much scarier place,” claiming that Iran is left with enough of an infrastructure to build a nuclear bomb in future.

faceintheclouds

 

 

 

 

harvest army

 

 

PAUL BEGLEY

 

 

 

 

DAHBOO77

 

 

Hunters Found Mysterious Ice Circles on Sheyenne River

 

 

Huge Sea Creature (Dactylobatus clarkii) Caught Off Miami Beach

 

 

Oldest Buddhist shrine found at Buddha’s birthplace in Nepal

 

 

Strippers for Jesus: Former Dancer Tries to Save Others

 

 

ABC World News Now : Ferocious Storm Strikes on Busy Travel Day

 

 

SHOCKING! Obamacare “Death Panels” Mimic Hitler’s T4 Eugenics Program

 

 

Syria UN Rep Jaafari Attacks Saudi Arabia for its Conduct & its Support of Wahhabi Terror in Syria

 

 

 

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One thought on “Drone wars to start: Pakistan builds its own fleet/IRAQ christians facing extinction/Strippers for Jesus: Former Dancer Tries to Save Others/U.S. B-52s flew over China’s newly declared air zone violating China’s Restrictions and more signs of JESUS’ soon return

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